HMRC extends late reporting deadline for CGT


On 6 April changes were made so that if a UK resident sells a residential property in the UK, they now have 30 days to tell HMRC and pay any money owed.

The seller must submit a standalone tax return covering the CGT, which can no longer be included as part of a self assessment return.

Failure to tell HMRC about any CGT within 30 days of completion may incur a penalty, as well as interest on the sum owed.

HMRC stated:

‘To help those selling properties familiarise themselves with the change in the rules and a new online process, HMRC is allowing a period of time to adjust and will not issue late filing penalties for CGT payment on account returns received late up to and including 31 July 2020.

‘For UK residents, this means transactions completed between 6 April and 30 June 2020 and reported up to 31 July 2020. Transactions completed from 1 July 2020 onwards will receive a late filing penalty if they are not reported within 30 calendar days.

‘Interest will accrue if the tax remains unpaid after 30 days.’

Internet link: HMRC guidance

Government launches support finding tool for business


The UK government launched an online platform to help businesses access financial support during the COVID-19 crisis.

The Coronavirus Business Support Finder Tool will guide businesses through the range of loans, tax reliefs and cash grants to combat the adverse economic effects of the COVID-19 lockdown.

The tool asks business owners to fill out a short online questionnaire. It then directs them to a list of financial support for which they may be eligible.

The tool takes the user through various questions about their business, including location, number of employees and turnover.

Chancellor Rishi Sunak said:

‘We’ve launched an unprecedented package of support to protect jobs, businesses and incomes during these challenging times. Millions are already benefiting and this new online tool will allow firms and individuals to identify what help they are entitled to in a matter of minutes.’

Internet link: GOV.UK publications

Lenders relax evidence requirements for business interruption loan scheme applications


On 27 April 2020 the UK’s seven largest small business lenders announced they had relaxed their evidence requirements for applications to the Coronavirus Business Interruption Loan Scheme (CBILS).

The lenders will use their own information when processing and approving applications, rather than relying on businesses providing forecasts and business plans.

In a joint statement, the seven lenders and trade association UK Finance stated:

‘The reforms to CBILS announced by the British Business Bank and HM Treasury with the support of the regulators provide welcome changes that should enable banks to provide finance to businesses more quickly alongside other forms of support including capital repayment holidays.

‘Lenders are working hard to ensure we provide support swiftly and responsibly and we will continue to work closely with customers to help them identify the finance that is right for their business and financial circumstances.

‘Following the changes to the scheme announced today lenders will only ask businesses for information and data they might reasonably be able to provide at speed and we will not require the provision of forward-looking financial information or business plans from businesses applying for CBILS-backed lending, relying instead on our own information to assess credit and business viability.’

Internet link: UK Finance press release

HMRC releases guidance for self-employed scheme


HMRC has released guidance on the COVID-19 Self-employment Income Support Scheme.

Under the scheme, self-employed individuals will be able to claim a taxable grant based on an average of their earnings over the past three years. To be eligible, workers must have filed all relevant income tax self assessment returns; have traded in the 2018/19 and 2019/20 tax years, and intend to carry on trading in the 2020/21 tax year. Profits, based on an average of the last three years, must be no more than £50,000, and at least equal to any non-trading income, such as employment income, dividends or rental income.

Directors of their own companies who are paid through Pay as You Earn (PAYE) may be able to get support via the Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme.

HMRC began to contact those eligible in early May and invited them to apply online. Payments are scheduled to start later in May and run for three months, but may be extended if necessary.

Internet link: GOV.UK publications 

Job Retention Scheme goes live


On 20 April 2020 the government’s Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme went live for applications.

The scheme allows businesses to furlough their employees, with the government paying 80% of their wages up to a maximum of £2,500.

The Coronavirus Job Retention Scheme is open for four months and was backdated from 1 March 2020 to the end of June. Chancellor Rishi Sunak stated that the scheme would be kept under review and extended if necessary.

There were applications from over 430,000 employers covering over three million employees in the first week of the scheme’s operation.

The Chancellor said:

‘We’ve taken unprecedented action to support jobs and businesses through this period of uncertainty, including the UK-wide Job Retention Scheme. With the extension of the coronavirus lockdown measures . . . it is the right decision to extend the furlough scheme for a month to the end of June to provide clarity.

‘It is vital for people’s livelihoods that the UK economy gets up and running again when it is safe to do so.’

Internet link: GOV.UK publications