Preparing the workforce for EU Exit


Over two thirds of EU citizens that are currently in the UK are here for work. The government is advising that if these individuals plan to remain living and working in the UK, after it leaves the EU, they can now apply to the EU Settlement Scheme (EUSS).

EU, EEA, or Swiss employees, and their family members, can apply to the EUSS if they want to continue to live, work, and study in the UK after 31 December 2020. This applies whether UK leave the EU with a deal or with a ‘no deal’.

Under the scheme, successful applications will be granted either settled or pre-settled status. Status depends on how long they have been living in the UK when they apply. In both cases, they can continue to work in the UK, use public services like the NHS, and access public funds such as pensions. Irish citizens do not need to apply.

The government has created an employer toolkit to help EU citizens with their application. The toolkit includes items such as posters and videos and information on how to apply. Employers do not have any obligation to share any information or even check whether employees have applied. However, they may wish to offer reassurance to their employees and make sure they have the right information.

However, employers have a duty not to discriminate against EU citizens with regards to the UK’s decision to leave the EU, both as a prospective and current employer.

Internet links: Agent Update 72 GOV.UK EUSS

Accountancy Vacancy


Are you looking for a career in accountancy or maybe looking for a new challenge to expand your accountancy skills. Then have a look at the type of roles we are looking for at Careers at Mcginty Demack

So, if you are looking to join McGinty Demacks’ apprenticeship programme, or if you are already experienced in the accountancy field then why not apply.  Complete the application form on our website.

ACCA gold accreditation trainee development

Help with connecting Quickbooks and Online Banking


To help with connecting Quickbooks and Online Banking McGinty Demack have produced a fact sheet.

Quickbooks will soon be updating the way they link to your bank. This is to improve the connection and help provide a better service.

To help keep you informed of this change please see our FAQ sheet below.  If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact us.

Open Banking FAQ

Non-compliance with minimum wage regulations


A recent Low Pay Commission (LPC) report sets out its findings on the number of people being paid less than the statutory minimum wage.

The LPC found that, in April 2018, 439,000 workers were paid less than the National Minimum Wage (NMW). Of this amount, 369,000 were employees aged 25 and over, who were paid less than the National Living Wage (NLW), an increase from previous years. On 1 April 2019, the NMW and NLW rates rose to the hourly rates detailed below:

Minimum wage rate Hourly rate from 1 April 2019
National Living Wage (for workers aged 25 and over) £8.21
21-24 year-old rate £7.70
18-20 year-old rate £6.15
16-17 year-old rate £4.35
Apprentice rate £3.90
Accommodation Offset £7.55 per day: £52.85 per week

The LPC also revealed that women are ‘more likely’ than men to be paid less than the NMW, and that underpayment is common amongst younger and older workers. In addition, underpayment was more common in certain sectors including hospitality, retail, cleaning, maintenance and childcare.

Commenting on the findings, Bryan Sanderson, Chair of the LPC, said:

‘Our analysis reveals a worrying number of people are being paid less than the minimum wage. We recently celebrated 20 years of the minimum wage – it has raised pay for millions of workers, but it is essential that people receive what they are entitled to.’

‘It is also vital for businesses to be able to operate on a level playing field, and not be illegally undercut on wages.’

Contact us for help with payroll issues.

Internet link: GOV.UK news

Consultation on ancillary capital gains reliefs


A capital gains tax (CGT) exemption applies when an individual disposes of a dwelling that has been used as their only or main residence under the Private Residence Relief (PRR) rules. The exemption applies as long as the relevant conditions are met throughout the total period of ownership. This relief is supplemented by ancillary reliefs that aim to deal with other related situations.

The government has previously announced and legislated to reform two of the ancillary reliefs  to better target PRR at owner-occupiers. The reliefs which are being amended are:

  • the final period exemption will be reduced from 18 months to nine months, although the special rules that give those with a disability, and those in care, an exemption of 36 months will not change
  • lettings relief will be reformed so that it only applies where an owner is in shared occupancy with a tenant.

These changes will take effect from 6 April 2020. The government is now consulting on the changes in more detail and on how they will work in practice. It also invites views on some technical aspects of the PRR rules.

Internet link: GOV.UK consultation