Christa Ackroyd loses IR35 appeal


Former BBC presenter Christa Ackroyd has lost her appeal against a ruling that she was an employee, not a freelance contractor, when she worked for the BBC via a personal service company.

The IR35 rules in broad terms mean that those working via a personal service company have to consider whether, if the services were provided by the individual contractor directly to the client, there would be a contract of employment.

Judges in the Upper Tier Tribunal upheld last year’s First Tier Tribunal ruling that she was a BBC employee when she presented Look North in Yorkshire and was therefore liable to pay income tax and national insurance contributions.

The case related to the tax years 2006/07 to 2012/13, while she worked for the public broadcaster through her personal service company, Christa Ackroyd Media (CAM).

HMRC argued that she owed almost £420,000 in income tax and national insurance contributions, before corporation tax deductions. An HMRC spokesperson said they welcomed the judgment that the presenter was within the intermediary rules.

Employment status is never a matter of choice; it is always dictated by the facts and when the wrong tax is being paid, we put things right.

It is right that an individual who works through a company, but would have been an employee if they were taken on directly, pays broadly the same amount of tax and national insurance contributions as employees.’

The IR35 rules were amended for Public Bodies (including the BBC) from April 2017 and the government will make similar changes for the private sector from April 2020.

Internet links: ICAEW news BAILII cases

Money Laundering non-compliance


HMRC has published details of businesses that have failed to comply with the Money Laundering, Terrorist Financing and Transfer of Funds (Information on the Payer) Regulations 2017.

HMRC is also advising that the published person may have changed their behaviour or no longer be based at the published address. Also that the business currently at the published address may have no connection with the published business, or may have the same name as the published business but could be under new, and completely different, management.

If you would like advice on anti-money laundering procedures please contact us.

Internet link: GOV.UK money laundering non-compliance

Experts warning over insolvency debts


Prioritising HMRC over other creditors in insolvencies will have a ‘negative impact on the UK’s economic growth’, experts have warned Chancellor of the Exchequer Sajid Javid.

The warning was issued in a letter from 11 business organisations and insolvency experts to the Chancellor. Signatories of the letter include the Institute of Chartered Accountants in England and Wales, the Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland, the Insolvency Practitioners Association and the City of London Law Society.

The letter says that the proposed change will make it more difficult to rescue businesses. According to the organisations, it will also reduce access to finance for small businesses, increase the harm done to other businesses in insolvencies and could ultimately result in losses to the Exchequer.

Writing in the letter, the organisations said:

‘While we understand that the government wishes to increase the value of taxes repaid in the event of insolvency, there is a serious risk that the wider costs of the government’s approach will outweigh any expected benefit.

This proposed policy would reverse successive governments’ attempts to encourage a culture of business rescue in the UK, and would undermine the government’s recent work to strengthen the UK’s insolvency and restructuring framework.’

The proposal, which was announced in the 2018 Budget and is now included in the draft Finance Bill, will see a change implemented from 6 April 2020. This would entail taxes, including the VAT, Pay as You Earn (PAYE), CIS and employee national insurance contributions (NICs) owed by an insolvent company to be paid to HMRC ahead of floating charge holders and unsecured creditors.

Internet link: Economia news

Senior clinicians’ pensions consultation


The government has launched a consultation on proposals to give senior NHS doctors and nurses access to more flexible pensions. The proposals aim to offer senior clinicians more control over their pensions growth.

The consultation follows reports that senior NHS clinicians pension tax charges are making them retire early or change their working habits. The Department of Health and Social Care estimates that a third of consultants and GPs may be turning down extra shifts because of how the NHS Pension Scheme interacts with the wider pension tax rules.

The new proposals are designed to allow those affected to have freedom to individually control how much their pension fund grows, allowing them to maximise the amount they can save without facing significant pension tax bills having breached limits on tax relief.

The new proposals include:

  • a ‘flexible accrual’ option where scheme members can choose an accrual level in 10% increments
  • the option to ‘fine tune’ pension growth towards the end of the scheme year, when total earnings are clearer.

The consultation closes on 1 November 2019.

Internet link: GOV.UK news